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NYE Exclusive Interview: Moon Taxi's Tommy Putnam December 17, 2018 18:17

Interview by Tiffany Clemons

Photo by Joseph Mikos Photography

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The indie rock quintet, Moon Taxi, is returning to their hometown of Nashville on New Year’s Eve to celebrate another huge year, as well as the finale of their Good as Gold Tour. It’s been over a decade since their formation back in 2006, and their dedication has led to shows in venues all over the country and literally every festival you can think of. They also have two, back-to-back sold out NYE shows in Nashville under their belts.

I was lucky enough to catch the guys a handful of times this year, each show more energetic and confetti filled than the last, including their show that almost wasn’t due to weather at SlossFest (RIP) in Birmingham, AL, the Which Stage at Bonnaroo, and at The Signal in Chattanooga with the funky fresh pop bangers, LUTHI, who hit multiple dates with Moon Taxi in 2018.

I was even more lucky to catch bass player, Tommy Putnam, for a few minutes to get the down low on this year’s NYE show. Check out the full conversation below, and if you're looking for last minute New Year's plans, it's not too late to grab your Moon Taxi tickets!

So, you guys formed in Nashville back in 2006, you all went to Belmont, blah blah blah, tell me the real story about how you all met, the story that you can’t already read on the internet.

Tommy: Trevor moved to Birmingham from Syracuse in either '98 or '99. One day, I was wearing a Phish T-shirt, and we started talking about the band. We quickly became friends and shortly after started playing music together, forming our high school band Apex. We moved to Nashville for college at Belmont and met Spencer the first day. Tyler came a few years later and then Wes shortly after. That’s the short version but there’s definitely a few more details. 

Moon Taxi is definitely a tight quintet, but if you could have anyone dead or alive be the 6th member, who would it be and why?

Tommy: I would probably have to go with Van Gogh because people tell me I look like him all the time (even though I have both ears). He could probably sub for me if I was sick or something. So that would be a good positive for me.

Now that 2018 is about to be in the books, what was your favorite show? 

Tommy: Mine was the Gorge with Dave Matthews, because it’s such a surreal venue for a show, and the nod from Dave himself was something special. I grew up with his music. I asked Trevor (Terndrup), and he said One Big Holiday with MMJ. I also asked Spencer (Thomson) and he said “I don’t know. I don’t really watch TV.” 

When can we expect new music? Do you have a favorite album to date? 

Tommy: New music should be out sometime soon, hopefully in the first half of 2019. I love all of our albums the same, but in different ways.

Moon Taxi is no stranger to NYE shows. Last year, you did a two-night run at the Tabernacle in Atlanta and back to back sold out shows at the War Memorial Auditorium here in Nashville in years prior. What can a first timer expect? Why should vets come back?

Tommy: The vets should definitely always come back because we always go bigger each year, and this NYE is no different. A first timer should expect to have their best NYE experience to date. 

This will be my first NYE show with you guys, and I’m super excited. I’m also looking forward to seeing LUTHI again and getting my dance on with Sparkle City Disco. What is your relationship with these other Nashville based groups? 

Tommy: We’ve had LUTHI as openers multiple times over the past few years and enjoy them as people and musicians. I haven’t met Sparkle City personally quite yet, but I’ve heard good things and I’m looking forward to doing so.

Can we expect any surprises at the NYE?

Tommy: There are always surprises at NYE, but it wouldn’t be a surprise if I told you about it right here, right?

Do y’all have a pre-show ritual? Anything special before a NYE show in particular?

Tommy: Not much, maybe a little bubbly and some fist bumps.

On any given night, especially NYE, there is a lot going on in Nashville. Why should everyone buy tickets to your show right now?

Tommy: Obviously I’m biased, but I think we throw the best party in the city. Let’s ring it in! 

For tickets to see Sparkle City Disco, LUTHI and Moon Taxi at the Municipal Auditorium in Nashville on NYE, click here.

 Watch the official music video for "Not Too Late" here:


SlossFest Will Feature Chris Stapleton, Arcade Fire, & Jason Isbell January 17, 2018 09:55

Photo by Craig Baird: Home Team Photography

These is no question that the music scene in Birmingham, AL is currently thriving as much as any city in the country. Sloss Music & Arts Festival is undoubtedly a major factor in that equation. The fourth year event, which has featured the likes of Widespread Panic, Sturgill Simpson, Alabama Shakes, The Flaming Lips, and Primus, revealed its 41-band lineup earlier this morning. This year's performers include Chris Stapleton, Arcade Fire, Jason Isbell & The 400 Unit, GRiZ, St. Paul & The Broken Bones, Vance Joy, The War on Drugs, Moon Taxi, and many more on July 14th-15th. Tickets go on sale this Friday, January 19th at 10:00 AM CST and can be purchased by clicking here. See below for a complete list of this year's performers.

Watch highlights from SlossFest 2017 here:


Looking Ahead To This Weekend's Sloss Music & Arts Festival March 20, 2017 01:55

Photo by Craig Baird: Home Team Photography

Share this post from our Facebook page and tag a friend in the comments for a chance to win a pair of GA Tickets + a framed SlossFest poster from The Beveled Edge.  The Beveled Edge will be on site framing posters all weekend.  

These is no question that the music scene in Birmingham, AL is currently thriving as much as any city in the country.  With longstanding venues such as Oak Mountain Amphitheater, Alabama Theatre, Sloss Furnace, WorkPlay, and Zydeco, you wouldn't think there would be much need for more. The continuous growth across the city has more than warranted new venues such as Iron City and Saturn, as well as the restoration of the historic Lyric Theatre. On top of the existing presence of live music on any given night, Birmingham is also the home of one of the newest major music events in the country, Sloss Music & Arts Festival

Without spoiling all of the details, Sloss Music & Arts Festival is a two-day music and lifestyle event that takes place at Sloss Furnaces National Historic Landmark in Birmingham, Alabama on Saturday, July 14th and Sunday, July 15th, 2018. The complete lineup can be found on the graphic listed below.  As we prepare for what is sure to be an epic weekend, we're listing off a handful of reasons why you simply don't want to miss SlossFest 2018.  

As part of our SlossFest preview coverage, we're giving away two General Admission weekend passes to one lucky winner.  In addition, the winner will also take home an official framed SlossFest poster from The Beveled Edge, who will be on site all weekend. To enter this contest, you must share this post directly from the Live & Listen Facebook page and tag a friend in the comments section of the post.  Make sure that your Facebook privacy settings are designated to 'public', so we can see that you shared the post on our end  A winner will be announced on Friday, July 13th.

Click Here: Purchase SlossFest Tickets Today!

SlossFest is a celebration of the unique, creative culture that makes life in Birmingham so unique.  In just four short years, SlossFest has established itself as a major national event, which features many of the biggest names on the music festival circuit, while also providing a tremendous opportunity for so many promising up-and-coming acts. 40 bands on 4 stages in one centralized Birmingham location.  What more could you ask for?

This year's lineup is anchored by Canadian indie rockers Arcade Fire, as well as singer/songwriters Chris Stapleton and Jason Isbell. The Birmingham-born talent will be featured early and often, most notably with the local legends St. Paul & The Broken Bones, as well as alt-rockers Moon Taxi, which features multiple band members who are also natives of the Iron City. Expect a powerful blend of American rock from The War on Drugs, while bands like Rainbow Kitten Surprise should provide a unique take on modern indie rock. Australian singer/songwriter Vance Joy is another performer who we expect to gain high praise from the Birmingham faithful. 

While much of the hype surrounding many other festivals of this nature points toward the jam rock, folk, indy, and alternative acts, SlossFest will feature a healthy serving of major names from the electronic and hip hop scenes. This year's lineup will feature the likes of GRiZ, Vic Mensa, Louis The Child, Jai Wolf, Hippie Sabotage, amongst others.  

Every major festival must have the major national names from across the musical spectrum to anchor the lineup, but filling those open daytime spots with the right acts is just as important.  You never know what point in the day might be your most ideal moment, where you find yourself watching a new band who becomes the best surprise of the weekend.  We're confident that you'll find just that with local performers such as Taylor HunnicuttWill StewartDead Fingers, and Captain Kudzu this weekend.

While there will be more than enough music to keep you entertained, you can't forget that SlossFest is a true music and arts festival.  Many of Birmingham's most vibrant live painters, visual artists, and specialists from all elements of the local artist community will be on site showcasing their work and helping create the festival scene. 

Whether you're looking for a certain food truck, a funky clothing boutique, or even special handmade jewelry, SlossFest will feature a massive roster of vendors from across Alabama and beyond.  As this festival continues to grow, the list of vendors has increased and one could spend much of the weekend simply shopping and supporting the various traveling businesses if they had enough time.  One of our favorite local vendors, The Beveled Edge, will be selling a variety of posters from different shows, while also providing on-site framing for official SlossFest posters.

Starr Hill Brewery will be on site with their Craft Works area this year.  Located directly next to the beer garden, Starr Hill will be showcasing beers exclusively available in the All Access area.  As one of the most award-winning craft breweries on the East Coast, Starr Hill Beer was made for live music.

The Piggly Wiggly Craftly Beerly Garden will showcase a variety of the finest craft breweries from the great State of Alabama, as well as the Southeast!  Whether you're a fan of the malt or the hops, this beer garden will have something for everyone.  Entry to the tent is free for all guests ages 21 and older, and each brewery represented will be available for purchase at participating Piggly Wiggly stores.

Click Here: Purchase SlossFest Tickets Today!

Check out the official highlights from SlossFest 2017 here: 


The Major Rager Announces Official 2017 Lineup January 24, 2017 09:28

Photo by Josh Timmermans: Noble Visions

Friends With Benefits Productions has revealed the lineup for The Major Rager (2017), the annual concert held in Augusta, GA on the Thursday of Master's Week.  The fourth annual concert will feature a headlining set from The Flaming Lips, as well as performances from People of the Sun (Moon Taxi performing the music of Rage Against The Machine), Eric Krasno Band, and Stop Light Observations.  Past performers at The Major Rager include Umphrey's McGee, Gov't Mule, Moon Taxi, Lettuce, The Revivalists, and Earphunk.  Early bird tickets can be purchased this Friday morning (1/27) at 10:00 AM EST.  For further details and official ticket information, visit the Friends With Benefits official website.

The Flaming Lips are an American rock band, formed in Norman, Oklahoma in 1983.  Melodically, their sound contains lush, multi-layered, psychedelic rock arrangements, but lyrically their compositions show elements of space rock, including unusual song and album titles—such as "Psychiatric Explorations of the Fetus with Needles", "Free Radicals (A Hallucination of the Christmas Skeleton Pleading with a Suicide Bomber)" and "Yeah, I Know It's a Drag... But Wastin' Pigs Is Still Radical". They are also acclaimed for their elaborate live shows, which feature costumes, balloons, puppets, video projections, complex stage light configurations, giant hands, large amounts of confetti, and frontman Wayne Coyne's signature man-sized plastic bubble, in which he traverses the audience. In 2002, Q magazine named The Flaming Lips one of the "50 Bands to See Before You Die".

The group recorded several albums and EPs on an indie label, Restless, in the 1980s and early 1990s. After signing to Warner Brothers, they scored a hit in 1993 with "She Don't Use Jelly". Although it has been their only hit single in the U.S., the band has maintained critical respect and, to a lesser extent, commercial viability through albums such as 1999's The Soft Bulletin (which was NME magazine's Album of the Year) and 2002's Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots. They have had more hit singles in the UK and Europe than in the U.S. In February 2007, they were nominated for a 2007 BRIT Award in the "Best International Act" category. By 2007, the group garnered three Grammy Awards, including two for Best Rock Instrumental Performance.

On October 13, 2009 the group released their latest studio album, titled Embryonic. On December 22, 2009, the Flaming Lips released a remake of the 1973 Pink Floyd album The Dark Side Of The Moon. In 2011, the band announced plans to release new songs in every month of the year, with the entire process filmed.

Watch The Flaming Lips' music video for "Do You Realize?" here:

The members of Moon Taxi are no strangers to the stage. Hailing from Nashville, the five-piece formed in 2006 and set out to conquer the Southeast with their unforgettable live set. Nine years later, they’ve amassed over one thousand shows and released two albums, Cabaret (2012) and Mountains Beaches Cities (2013). The latter landed the band their first National late-night television appearances on the Late Show with David Letterman and Conan as well as multiple commercial and TV placements including BMW, Nashville, MLB, NFL and HBO Sports to name a few. With a rabid fan base under their belts, they’ve upped the ante this year to become a festival favorite with recent performances at Bonnaroo, Governor’s Ball, Wakarusa, Houston Free Press and upcoming appearances at Lollapalooza and Austin City Limits.   Moon Taxi will perform as People of the Sun at The Major Rager, which will consist of an entire set of Rage Against The Machine covers (as seen at Hangout Festival 2014 & 2016).

Watch Moon Taxi (People of the Sun) perform "Sleep Now In The Fire" here:

Eric Krasno is a 2x Grammy winning guitarist, musician & producer best known for his work with Soulive, Lettuce, Tedeschi Trucks Band & Pretty Lights.  For nearly two decades, Eric Krasno has been an omnipresent figure in popular music. We've heard his virtuosic, innovative guitar playing with Soulive and Lettuce (both of which he co-founded), seen him onstage supporting the likes of the Rolling Stones and The Roots, watched him take home multiple GRAMMY Awards, and benefited from his deft, behind-the-scenes work as a producer and songwriter for everyone from Norah Jones, Tedeschi Trucks, and 50 Cent to Talib Kweli, Aaron Neville, and Allen Stone. Krasno's rousing new solo album, 'Blood From A Stone,' reveals a previously unknown and utterly compelling side of his artistry, though, inviting us to bear witness as he both literally and metaphorically finds his voice.

Watch Eric Krasno Band perform 'Curse Lifter" here:

Home-grown Charleston, SC band Stop Light Observations (a.k.a. SLO) started playing together at the age of 13 when songwriter and pianist John Keith "Cubby" Culbreth asked guitarist Louis Duffie the iconic teenager boy question, "Wanna start a band?" His response was, "Yes."  The young years were spent writing songs with captivating melodies and meaningful lyrics. The duo picked up childhood friends Luke Withers and Will Blackburn to "play dem' drums and sing dem' songs!" Over time they added Coleman Sawyer on bass and fiddle and Wyatt Garrey on lead guitar, which formulated the powerful six-piece band known today as Stop Light Observations.

SLO has been described as Southern-Retro-Electro-Rock with influences of Classic, Revival, Psychedelic, Garage, and Arena Rock, with Indie, Motown, Hip-hop and Folk flares.  They are driven by the thrill they get from performing and writing songs, but the camaraderie among these lifelong friends is what keeps them close.  SLO plans on furthering their impact on the national music fan community while having some fun and changing some lives for the good while they're at it.

Watch Stop Light Observations perform "Aquarius Apocalyptic" on Jam In The Van here:


Looking Back On LOCKN': A Weekend In Review September 04, 2016 14:20

Words by Jordan Kirkland: Live & Listen
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Photos by Keith Griner: Phierce Photography
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Now that I have had nearly seven full days to digest what I witnessed last weekend, it only seems appropriate to attempt to explain my LOCKN' experience.  This was something I planned to do earlier in the week, before coming down with a mild case of what many have called the "wook flu."  My friends and I set out out on the journey from Alabama to Virginia just before sunrise on Thursday, August 25th, slightly apprehensive and anxious about a four day festival in the heat of summer.  With arguably the best lineup of bands I've ever seen (extra stess on "arguably," as it's all relative), excitement was certainly abound.  Luckily, some friends hooked us up with a few extra forest camping passes, which proved to be a total game changer.  We managed to set up camp just in time to head to the concert grounds for Vulfpeck's opening set, which served as a perfect intro to the epic weekend ahead.

Vulfpeck has been one of the hottest bands in the festival scene for nearly two years, and their live show speaks for itself.  What you see is what you get with Vulfpeck. They keep it as simple as possible, playing real instruments with essentially no effects. This making for a a very raw, natural outcome.  This set was highlighted by several of their hits, such as "Funky Duck," "1612," and "Put It In My Back Pocket," as well as a cover of Steely Dan's "Peg" that nearly lit the crowd on fire.  As they finished up, the massive crowd had its first glimpse at the infamous "turntable stage," which Umphrey's McGee took full advantage of.  Within three seconds of Vulfpeck stopping, Umphreys cranked into full effect with "Nipple Trix" as the stage rotated, which quickly segued into one of my personal favorites, "1348."  

The set continued with "Attachments" and "The Triple Wide," one of the bands biggest jam vehicles.  The "2x2" > "Speak Up" > "2x2" sequence moved swiftly into a raging take on "Puppet String," ultimately leading into "Roctopus."  At this time, Brendan Bayliss called upon none other than Gene Ween, who performed an entire set with Umphrey's last summer known as "God Boner."  Being that ole Gene has an uncanny resemblance to Billy Joel these days, the decision to cover Joel's "The Stranger" was well received.  With little time to spare, the band then segued back into "Puppet String," before "All In Time" closed things out in powerful fashion.   

Watch Umphrey's perform "The Stranger" with Gene Ween here:
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Next to take the stage was Ween, who was slated for the evening's headlining set.  It was clear early on that many in attendance did not know what to expect from these guys; myself included.  While I've casually listened to Ween over the last fifteen years, I never dove in deep, and I'd never had a chance to see them live.  While their were some very bizarre moments, I loved every minute of it.  These guys managed to pump out 26 total songs, including many I was familiar with such as "Transdermal Celebration," "Mister, Would You Please Help My Pony," "How High Can You Fly," "Beacon Light, "Baby Bitch," "Boys Club," "Fat Lenny," "Push The Little Daisies," "Ocean Man," and "Zoloft."  We've made it a full week since this set, and I'm still talkin' bout "Boys Club."  I can't help but think that Dean and Gene must be somehow related to Trey Parker and Matt Stone (creators of South Park), and last weekend further affirmed that assumption.  

After a truly exhausting two hours with Ween, there was just enough time for the first of many cool down sessions back at the car.  These sessions were critical, as we had a chance to turn up the A/C, charge the cell phone, and collect our completely scattered thoughts.  There wasn't much time to waste though, as Joe Russo's Almost Dead was up next at the Blue Ridge Bowl.  This was arguably my most highly anticipated performance of the weekend.  Like many others, I had been dying to see this band since its inception three years ago, but they don't tour extensively.  So, this was my first opportunity to catch their set, and I'll just say this.  JRAD uses the catalog of the Grateful Dead as a launching pad into something that is totally its own.  

I was absolutely blown away by my first JRAD experience, which kicked off with "Space" > "Truckin'," before moving into an absolute monster "St. Stephen."  "The Eleven" and "Brown Eyed Women" would follow, before "The Wheel" opened up another insane improv section.  The set continued with powerful takes on "Estimated Prophet," "Tennessee Jed," and "Viola Lee Blues," and a beautiful take on "He's Gone" would follow.  Right around 3:15 AM, the band busted into "Terrapin Station," and you better believe we got the full Terrapin Suite.  This was easily the best late night set I'd experienced at this point, and one of the best Dead sets I've ever witnessed.  Keep in mind that I'm a child of the late 80's.  

Watch JRAD perform "He's Gone" > "Terrapin Station" here:
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While it was already nearly 90 degrees upon waking up on Friday, the lineup ahead of us demanded our full effort and attention.  Turkuaz was scheduled for a 12:30 PM power funk lunch session, and that's something you just can't miss out on.  This is one of the most entertaining, high-energy bands in the festival circuit, and they've only scratched the surface.   These guys are incredibly tight, and the level of choreography that goes into each set can't go unnoticed.  The set ultimately closed with an amazing rendition of The Band's "Shape I'm In," to which the stage rotated with Vulfpeck in full effect.

As much as I hated to walk away from Vulfpeck, I knew that my next move was arguably my most critical decision of the weekend, and the "Infinity Downs" area had a live video stream of the main stage.  I made my way over to the almighty Vida-Flo RV, which treated me to an incredibly pleasant experience.  The fine folks at Vida-Flo spent their majority of time at LOCKN' helping others rehydrate and obtain a much needed second wind to fight through the outrageously hot and humid weekend.  "The LOCKN' Special" put me exactly where I needed to be, and I was able to enjoy Vulfpeck's covers of "Boogie On Reggae Woman" and "Tell Me Somethin' Good" during the procress.  I can't say enough about Jamey, Katie, and the rest of the Vida-Flo team for the service they provided to so many at LOCKN'.

The remainder of Friday afternoon was highlighted by performances from White Denim, Charles Bradley & His Extraordinaires, and Peter Wolf (of the J Geils Band).  With my new found energy and hydration, I made it back to the concert grounds and enjoyed a seriously rockin' set from White Denim, who I'd been looking forward to seeing for several years.  While I definitely haven't given White Denim the attention they deserve over the years, I have loved everything I've heard from these guys.  Songs like "Ha Ha Ha Ha (Yeah)" and "At Night In Dreams" have been staples in my regular rotation for some time, and the entire Corsica Lemonade album is simply brilliant.  

One lifesaving factor to my LOCKN' experience that I have failed to mention thus far is the hospitality that we experienced at Starr Hill Brewery tent, which was located at the back of the concert grounds.  Starr Hill, a craft brewery based in Crozet, VA, is the official beer sponsor of LOCKN', and I'm not sure how we would've survived without it.  Fortunately, a longtime childhood friend works for the brewery and granted us access to the tent the entire weekend.  Shade, fans with mist, cool beer, and most importantly water, were made available to all of Starr Hill's patrons this weekend, as well as a distant view of the main stage.  The luxury of watching White Denim and part of Charles Bradley's set from the Starr Hill tent was a perfect way to continue the afternoon.  Star Hill Brewery probably saved our lives last weekend.

As the sun began to set, Ween returned to the stage for it's second set of the weekend.  While this set was closer to 80-90 minutes, it was an absolute scorcher.  One of my top highlights from the weekend came in the form of "Roses Are Free" > "Your Party" > "Bananas and Blow" > "Voodoo Lady."  Several other classics, including "Mutilated Lips," "Spinal Meningitis," "Piss Up A Rope," and "Buckingham Green" helped make this set one that I'll never forget.  

The stage was now set for a moment that so many were waiting for.  Phish was slated for two full sets as the Friday night headliner.  While the 90-minute break in music felt like an eternity, this was soon forgotten as the band took the stage and ripped into the opening notes of "Wilson."  Despite a few miscues in "Wilson," as well as the intro to "Down With Disease," this set was off to a really hot start.  "Free" and "Wolfman's Brother" would follow, before we were treated to a "Tube" which featured that extended jam that has been somewhat rare in recent years.  Next up was "555," which even went further than it typically does with a next outtro jam.  

"It's Ice" was probably the highlight of the first set for me, as it's just one of those songs that I tend to miss by one show.  "Wingsuit," which may be the most underrated song in the Phish catalog, slowed the pace and ultimately led into one of the most beautiful jams of the weekend.  The transition into "Simple" pumped a new life into the massive crowd, and just when you thought the set was over, the lights shifted to one particular mic stand, indicating an acapella performance.  I was lucky enough to witness the debut of David Bowie's "Space Oddity" at Wrigley Field in June, and I was elated to hear it again on Friday night.  There's nothing quite like their spin on that classic tune.

After a brief intermission, Trey wasted no time busting into "Punch You In The Eye," and he didn't let off the gas once.  "Blaze On" and "Fuego" were perfectly executed, and the "Ghost" that followed was easily the biggest jam of the night.  The segue into "Bathtub Gin" was seemless, and "Backwards Down The Number Line" provided an amazing, nostalgic sing-a-long, as it always does.  Any set that ends with "You Enjoy Myself" is a treat, and this was the case on Friday.  The trampolines came out, and Trey even gave us a little break dancing expo during Mike's solo.  The "Ass Handed" tease during the eventual vocal jam was icing on the cake.  You can only do so much with an encore after "YEM," and this was a night where "Character Zero" was the perfect choice.  Just like that, Phish's first LOCKN' set was over, and we couldn't have asked for much more.

I won't get too repetitive when discussing the second late night set from JRAD, but goodness gracious, it was amazing.  Just the fact that our evening included Ween > Phish > JRAD was hard to believe.  "Good Lovin" kicked off the set, and "Shakedown Street," "China Cat Sunflower," and "I Know You Rider" would follow.  The band welcomed Nicole Adkins to the stage to add a little Donna Jean flare to "Dancin' In The Streets," "The Music Never Stopped," and "Turn On Your Lovelight."  I was not familiar with Adkins prior to this set, but wow...she's got some serious pipes.  Her involvement in this set was something that will always stand out when thinking back on this one.  Fortunately, she stuck around for harmony vocals on the "Franklin's Tower," "Thowing Stones," and "Not Fade Away" which closed out night two at LOCKN'.  Joe Russo's ability to command and lead this band from behind the drum kit is absolutely remarkable, and I've never seen anything like it.  We are talking about one of the most talented drummers on the planet though, so I guess no one should be surprised.

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We were now halfway through our LOCKN' experience, and waking up knowing that there were two more days of this madness was hard to believe.  Just like every other day, the lineup was slam packed full of "must see" bands, starting with Keller Williams' Grateful Grass at the Blue Ridge Bowl, or at least what was left of it from the two nights of JRAD destruction.  The Grateful Grass experience features a rotating cast of bluegrass musicians.  It's gotten to the point that Keller looks at the Dead's catalog as it's own genre, similar to jazz, as musicians can simply jump on stage with very little experience playing with one another and just roll with it.  I'd highly recommend reading Live Music Daily's interview with Keller from LOCKN', where he goes in depth on the evolution of the Grateful Grass concept.  

Listen to the entire Grateful Gospel set here:
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Moon Taxi was first up on the main stage, and they had the farm rocking at an early hour.  It's been a true pleasure watching this band progress from the college bar scene to touring across the country playing many of the most prestigious venues.  Their ability to find a balance between jam and mainstream rock is brilliant, and I can only imagine the dividends that it is paying.  Twiddle was up next, and I can't say enough about this band.  I feel like I haven't stopped listening to Twiddle all summer, and I've been fortunate to attend two summer festivals (LOCKN' and The Werk Out) which featured two sets of Twiddle.  "Jamflowman" and "When It Rains It Pours" gave me my two favorite Twiddle originals, and Keller Williams' sit-in on "Best Feeling" was likely the top spontaneous collaboration of the weekend.  

Watch Twiddle and Keller Williams perform "Best Feeling" here:
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Thanks to the champions at SiriusXM JamOn, nearly every major set at LOCKN' was broadcasted live, which you wouldn't think would impact those of us at the festival.  You have to take a break at some point though, especially amidst the extreme heat and humidity last weekend.  While I didn't watch the Galactic set with Lee Oskar, I was able to listen live from my car, which was a major luxury.  Galactic has been an anchor in the jam/festival scene for as long as I can remember, and they delivered once again.  Hard Working Americans were next on stage, providing me with my first chance to see this super group in person.  

While I've been a huge Widespread Panic fan for 15+ years, my eyes were glued to Neal Casal's guitar playing.  This guy is one of the best in the business, and easily one of the "hardest working" musicians around.  He was easily the MVP of the weekend, performing with HWA, Chris Robinson Brotherhood, Phil Lesh & Friends, and Circles Around The Sun.  Todd Snider's unique stage presence and style was a treat to watch, and it was a lot of fun watching Dave Schools and Duane Trucks jamming together with these guys.  

Saturday's Phil & Friends lineup was easily one of the most hyped moments of the weekend, and how could it not have been?  Who would have ever thought we would see Phil Lesh, Page McConnell, Jon Fishman, Joe Russo, Anders Osborne, and The Infamous Stringdusters play an entire set together?  How about adding Derek Trucks and Susan Tedeschi for two songs ("Mr Charlie" > "Sugaree")?  That is absolutely ridiculous, and yes, it really happened.  Seeing the stage rotate with this cast, while they busted into "Scarlet Begonias," was a memory I will always cherish.  I know I'll be listening to their renditions of "Dire Wolf," "Uncle John's Band," "Shakedown Street," and "Terrapin Station" (even if it wasn't the full Terrapin Suite) for the rest of my life.  

Most festivals would have probably featured that type of set as the night's headliner, but we weren't even close to that point.  The world class Tedeschi Trucks Band was up next for a super soulful ride into the evening.  Each night as the sun would go down, the crowd was able to breathe a little easier without the brutal sun beating down on us, and Tedeschi Trucks was a perfect way to ease into the night.  Joe Cocker's "The Letter", "Keep On Growing," and "Let Me Get By" rounded out this killer performance, setting the stage for the set that everyone is still talking about.

My Morning Jacket is no stranger to the festival scene, and it's no secret that they are one of the greatest rock-and-roll bands of our era.  That being said, I don't think anyone realized how dynamic this headlining set would be.  MMJ started in familiar territory with "Victory Dance," which flowed perfectly into a sequence of "Compound Fracture" > "Off The Record."  Next up was "Steam Engine," before a cover of Burt Bacharch's "What The World Needs Now" that had some true magic to it.  "I'm Amazed," "Spring," "Phone Went West, and Bob Marley's "Could You Be Loved" would follow and keep this set alive.  "Magheeta" would precede another epic moment, as James led the band through a well executed cover of Prince's "Purple Rain."  The set's closing sequence of "Wordless Chorus" > "Touch Me I'm Going To Scream (Pt.2)," David Bowie's "Rebel, Rebel" and "One Big Holiday" couldn't have been written up any better.  MMJ was headlining the jam scene's biggest festival of the summer, and they dialed up a list of songs that reflected that.  The hype surrounding this set is absolutely justified, and anyone who had already seen this band perform wasn't surprised in the least.  Is there a bigger modern rock star than Jim James?  

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Saturday's late night at Blue Ridge Bowl provided a much needed dose of funk as Lettuce took control of the party.  It's always a special occasion when Nigel Hall (keys/vocals) is on stage, adding an extra vocal element and opening up so many different options for this insanely talented group.  Prior to the set, drummer Adam Deitch and guitarist Adam “Shmeeans” Smirnoff promised fans the most psychedelic set of their career, and they delivered just that.  This set was specially crafted for LOCKN', and you can't help but tip your cap to these guys for such an appropriate approach.

For many, Sunday started off with a much needed church session, and luckily, Keller Williams was slated for his annual "Grateful Gospel" set.  Joining Keller on lead guitar was none other than John Kadlecick, who's known for co-founding Dark Star Orchestra in 1997, as well as joining Furthur in 2009. The female backing vocalists truly added a church-like gospel feel throughout the set, but I highly recommending watching the performance of "We Bid You Goodnight" below.  I can't imagine a better way to start your day at a festival than 90-minutes of Keller's Grateful Gospel.

Watch the "Moonlight Midnight" > "We Bid You Goodnight" sequence from Keller's Grateful Gospel here:
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I was unable to make it to the main stage for the afternoon's first two performers, The Dharma Initiative and Doobie Decibel System, but there was definitely a buzz about both performances.  As amazing as this year's lineup was, it can be painful when deciding which sets you have to take a break during.  Fortunately, our campsite was within listening distance for even these sets that weren't streamed live via JamOn.  I knew I couldn't miss Twiddle's encore performance.  It's amazing to watch this band continue to flourish and reel in new fans on the biggest stage.  Sunday's set started off with "Blunderbus, "Daydream Farmer," and "Beehop," before "Lost In The Cold" seemed to have the entire farm singing in unison.  "Carte Candlestick" and "Frankenfoote" ultimately closed out the short set, as the band was again slotted for just 60-minutes.  While most any band would kill for 60-minutes at LOCKN', you just want so much more once this band gets going.  I'll be shocked if we don't see these guys back on Oak Ridge Farm in 2017.

Watch Twiddle perform "Daydream Farmer" at LOCKN' here:
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Every music festival could use a nice dose of reggae, and who better to provide that than the band who taught us about this genre, The Wailers.  These seasoned vets took the stage and laid down literally every Bob Marley / Wailers hit that you've ever heard.  This music always generates a notable energy amongst a crowd, but it was something really special on Sunday afternoon. You've got to love the planning and attention to detail with the placement of each band on this lineup.  There is absolutely a science to it, and Peter Shapiro knows it as well as anyone in the game.

Chris Robinson Brotherhood took the stage fairly late in the afternoon, and they had their work cut out for them.  Not only were they slated for 90-minutes of originals, but they would then join Phil Lesh for the weekend's second set of Phil & Friends.  The CRB set was highlighted by originals such as "Leave My Guitar Alone," "Forever As The Moon," "New Cannonball Rag," and "Ain't Hard But Fair," while Jackie Moore's "Precious, Precious" and Bob Dylan's "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue" rounded things out.  The band's latest hit single, "Narcissistic and Soaking Wet" would ultimately close things out.

Watch Chris Robinson Brotherhood perform "Narcissistic Soaking Wet" at LOCKN' here:
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While Saturday's Phil & Friends lineup featured the sexier lineup on paper, I personally thought Sunday's set had the true feel of a Dead set.  Perhaps it was presence of weekend MVP Neal Casal, who just knows how to play it like Jerry.  I've always been a fan of Robinson's vocals, and he really delivered for this one.  Just as the stage began to rotate, Phil, the boys from CRB, and Gary Clark Jr. began ripping into "Samson & Delilah."  "Good Morning Little School Girl" and "Wang Dang Doodle" were perfect choices, and the decision to play The Dead's version of Otis Redding's "Hard To Handle" was one of my favorite moments of the weekend.  This song might be the most commonly covered song in rock-and-roll, but hearing Chris Robinson sing it to The Dead's tempo was a fucking treat.  Do yourself a favor and watch the video footage below and see for yourself.  "Fire On The Mountain" and "New Speedway Boogie" opened things up for yet another monster "St. Stephen," and "The Wheel" wasn't going to slow down.  There aren't many songs in the Dead catalog better suited for a party than "Turn On Your Lovelight" (Bobby Bland), and Robinson crushed every note.  It was refreshing and reassuring to see Phil having such a great time, surrounded by so many world class musicians at LOCKN'  

Watch Phil Lesh & Friends perform "Hard to Handle" here:
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Gary Clark Jr. might have been the most intriguing act on the lineup entering the weekend.  While I've heard "Bright Lights" and "Don't Owe You a Thing" as many times as I can remember on JamOn, I just haven't given this guy the attention he deserves. I've been well aware of his reputation and status across the scene in general, but I was way past due for a Gary Clark Jr. set.  He and his band came out swinging as they opened with "Bright Lights," and swiftly moved into "Travis County," "Next Door Neighbor Blues," "Cold Blooded," and "BYOB."  The crowd continued filling in, and the set eventually closed out with "Don't Owe You A Thing," "You Saved Me," and "Shake.  The sound that this guy has is out of this world.  There are moments where My Morning Jacket, Kings of Leon, Jimi Hendrix, and White Denim all come to mind, except that Clark compliments the heavy riffs with one of the most soulful voices you've ever heard. 

Watch Gary Clark Jr. perform "Bright Lights" at LOCKN' here:
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The stage was now set for one final time, and you couldn't help but stand up and look around at the scene that awaited.  The energy at Oak Ridge Farm on Sunday night was impalpable, with 30,000+ fans riding high on four days of music with two more sets of Phish to come.  Each day as the sun would set, we experienced significant release as the temperature seemed to instantly drop fifteen degrees, and this held true once again on Sunday.  Phish took the stage right around 8:30 PM, and "Sample In A Jar" was first up to the plate.  Page then cued the now infamous vocal tracking of "Martian Monster," much to the approval of the LOCKN' faithful.  I really wish they would jam this one out more than they do now, and it feels like more appropriate in the second set (Ex: Atlanta, GA - July 31st, 2015), they're typically throwing it in early and keeping it fairly tamed.

 

The first set stayed super hot with "Axilla" and "The Moma Dance," before "Halley's Comet" provided that absurd, silly sing-a-long that very few are capable of pulling off.  We were then given a double-dose of the band's 1986 cassette tape release The White Tape with "AC/DC Bag" > "Fuck Your Face."  The sequence of "Fuck Your Face" > "46 Days" is about as heavy rock-and-roll as you can ask for from Phish.  "The Line" was a bit of a curveball, as it tends to be, but "Limb By Limb," "Possum," and "First Tube" would follow and wrap up a very, very solid first yet.  

There were high expectations for a wave of heavy hitters in set two, and they were exceeded, as usual.  "Carini" lit a fire across the farm and flowed nicely into the "Chalkdust Torture" that you knew was coming as some point.  "Twist" seems to be one of the jams of 2016, and I don't think anyone is complaining.  I've been a sucker for "Light" since the release of Joy in 2009, as this tune has become one of the bigger jam vehicles of the Phish 3.0 era.  The "Light" jam ultimately landed into "Tweezer," prompting a mildly concerning glow stick war on Oak Ridge Farm.  Led Zeppelin's "No Quarter" was next, prompting McConnell to guide us through the classic cover.  I'm assuming the guy next to me promised his friends that he would do a headstand if Phish was to play "No Quarter," because he went ballistic during the opening notes, and his friends proceeded to lift his feet to the sky as he hit the deck.  Truly remarkable.

From here, we went into full "space jam" mode, as Fishman dropped into the opening beat of "Also Sprach Zarathustra," aka "2001 (Space Odyssey)."  That's a dance party that never gets old.  It was apparently Fishman's moment, as he then dropped into the opening notes of "Harry Hood," which seemed to be a likely place for the set to end.  As I've said before...just when you think you know, this band proves you wrong.  They tacked on a "Tweezer Reprise" just for safe measure and made sure that this crowd was still on it's toes.  After a brief exit, the band returned and broke into The Rolling Stones' "Loving Cup" and closed out the festival with everyone screaming "What a beautiful buzz!"  While it might not have been a shocking encore selection, it felt extremely appropriate.  

Sitting down and reliving this unforgettable experience over the past few days has allowed me to fully comprehend the remarkable journey we took just a week ago.  It's easy to get caught up in the fatigue, anxiety, and pressure to "get back into a normal" rhythm after these huge musical weekends, but it's equally important to reflect and cherish the moment.  As much fun as it was, it certainly wasn't easy.  I've never dealt with that type of heat, humidity, and pure exhaustion without access to "going inside."  In the long run, that makes the experience that much more unique, and it definitely makes for better story-telling.  There were twelve different bands on this lineup that I have travelled to see play on their own, and some on multiple occasions.  Top that off with the fact that this marked my 30th show with my favorite band: Phish.  What's left to say?  My ability to continue embarking on these musical adventures with so many of the world's greatest friends is an element of life that I'll never take for granted.  Until next time, LOCKN'...

Special thanks to Keith Griner of Phierce Photography for capturing this weekend for us and allowing us to share it with you all.


LOCKN' Festival Announces Additions to 2016 Lineup March 24, 2016 09:59

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LOCKN' Festival has announced a handful of additions to it's already stacked lineup this morning. The highly anticipated annual festival is scheduled for August 25th - 28th on Oak Ridge Farm in Arrington, VA.  The additions include a second late night with Joe Russo's Almost Dead, EOTO, Hard Working Americans, Moon Taxi, Donna the Buffalo, Doobie Decibel System, Circles Around The Sun, and Garcia's Forest. This will also be the first live performance for Circles Around The Sun, Neal Casal's group that composed the music for set breaks at Fare Thee Well. It is unclear who will be involved with Garcia's Forest, a band with no specific backstory.  
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Just last month, LOCKN' made quite the splash with it's initial lineup announcement, which boasted the likes of Phish (2 nights, 4 total sets), Ween (2 nights, 2 total sets), My Morning JacketUmphrey's McGee Tedeschi Trucks Band, White DenimVulfpeckGary Clark Jr.GalacticKeller WilliamsChris Robinson BrotherhoodTurkuaz, and more. Stay tuned, as we expect to see more additions to the LOCKN' lineup before its all said and done.
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