Live Album Showcase: Dickey Betts 'Live from the Lone Star Roadhouse' February 01, 2019 12:08

Live and Listen’s Live Album Showcase

Dickey Betts: Live from the Lone Star Roadhouse

 Words by Josh Hetterman

Taped recordings have long been an integral cog of the live music scene. This is the first installment of a weekly series highlighting iconic live albums from the last half century. Today, we will take a close look at the Allman Brothers Band founding member and guitarist Dickey Betts’ 2018 EP Live at the Lone Star Roadhouse, recorded in 1988 with his band Great Southern.

After a tumultuous and frantic decade that saw the tragic deaths of founding members Duane Allman and Berry Oakley, the Allman Brothers Band broke up in 1982. Speaking on the breakup, Dickey Betts stated, “We broke up in '82 because we decided we better just back out or we would ruin what was left of the band's image.” Other than a brief co-headlining tour led by Betts and Gregg Allman in 1986, the band’s members focused primarily on their solo careers, especially Betts and Allman. During this time, Betts, the enigmatic but superbly talented guitarist and songwriter who penned iconic ABB hits such as “Ramblin’ Man,” “Southbound” and “Jessica,” reunited his band Dickey Betts and Great Southern, which featured a young, hungry guitar virtuoso by the name of Warren Haynes.

Despite being recorded on January 11th, 1988, Dickey Betts and Great Southern: Live from the Lone Star Roadhouse was not released to the public until April 21, 2018. It was featured as one of the premiere, exclusive releases of the internationally recognized celebration and homage to vinyl records, with a limited run of 1400. Upon first listen, the 90 minute EP surely did not disappoint; in fact, it is so solid from start to finish that it should hold a place in the upper echelon of ABB records for any fan of the band.

Side 1 of the record features a 4 song set highlighted by Betts compositions and ABB staples such as “Blue Sky,” “Jessica” and “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed.” The musical apex, however, occurs during Betts’ instrumental tribute to his legendary fallen bandmate and ABB co-founder Duane Allman on “Duane’s Tune,” a single off the Dickey Betts Band’s 1988 album Pattern Disruptive. Dickey introduces the song with a noticeable excitement, and strong percussion complements his and Warren Haynes’ driving guitar harmonies throughout the six and a half minute track. Even without explicit knowledge of the song’s dedication to Duane, even an amateur ABB fan could tell this is an impassioned tribute to the late founding member of the band. Phenomenal slide guitar and a driving rhythm carry the song and remind us of the impact that the legendary guitarist had on his bandmates and the music world at large.

Side 2 opens with a few more ABB classics in spirited renditions of “Statesboro Blues” and “One Way Out.” Adding to the already palpable star power, guitarist Rick Derringer came out to guest on his hit song “Rock ’n Roll Hoochie Koo,” and was immediately followed by legendary Cream guitarist Jack Bruce sitting in on a cover of Howlin’ Wolf’s “Spoonful.” Bringing the set to a rocking close, the band hits the high note with a 10 minute version of another Betts original and ABB classic in “Southbound.” Dickey Betts’ legacy has long been muddled by his tumultuous personal life and well-documented rifts with fan favorite Gregg Allman. Despite this, there is no logical argument against his impact not only as a guitarist and songwriter but also as a founding member of one of the greatest bands of all time. Dickey Betts: Live from the Lone Star Roadhouse does nothing to weaken this argument: he is, and always has been, a brilliant musician and songwriter and should be celebrated as such.